Dwarf Dogwood


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British Columbia Outdoor Wilderness Guide

Dwarf Dogwood
Dwarf Dogwood
(Cornus cadensis)
a.k.a. bunchberry, pigeon berry
The Dwarf Dogwood is related to the flowering dogwood trees. These low, trailing plants (5-25 cm./3-8 in. tall) are abundant throughout Canadian forests coast to coast.

LEAVES:
- Dwarf Dogwood leaves are oval, parallel veined, 2-8 cm. long
- in groups of 4 to 7 on a short stalk
- bright green with a whitish underside
FLOWERS:
- Flowers on the Dwarf Dogwood appear in late spring
- the flowers appear to have 4 white petals
- these are really the bracts that surround the flower itself which is a cluster af small (2 to 3 mm.), greenish petals bracts
Dwarf DogwoodFRUIT:
- small (5 mm.), shiny, red berries that form in August
- non-poisonous, appealing to birds
HABITAT:
- Dwarf Dogwood are found in shady, moist areas in sea level to subalpine elevations throughout the province
- Dwarf Dogwoodcan be found on old stumps or logs, meadows and bogs
FASCINATING FACTS:
- Dwarf Dogwood was introduced from Europe
- in the evening the flowers close
- the young tender leaves can be cooked or eaten raw as a salad green
- resembles the dogwood tree in everything but size
- by a unique mechanism the petals can propel the pollen into the air.

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Dwarf Dogwood